Essays and Features

Torture, Imprisonment, and Political Assassination in the Arab Novel

By 
Sabry Hafez

Arabic literature is perhaps one of very few literary traditions that have a distinct literary genre known as the "prison novel." This is not only because a great majority of writers have themselves lived the experience of arrest, imprisonment, and even torture, but also because the history of the contemporary Arab intellectual is one of constant struggle with the authorities.

Arabic literature is perhaps one of very few literary traditions that have a distinct literary genre known as the "prison novel." This is not only because a great majority of writers have themselves lived the experience of arrest, imprisonment, and even torture, but also because the history of the contemporary Arab intellectual is one of constant struggle with the authorities.

Who Is Being Veiled?

By 
Etel Adnan

My friend Inge phoned from San Francisco to ask me if she had to buy a chador in order to visit the magnificent mosques of Isfahan and Turkey. I said that for Turkey I did not think she would need to, but that for Isfahan I was not sure, though usually in Islamic countries Western women and Christian women in general weren't obliged to wear the veil. The conversation went on, and we ended up discussing "fundamentalists'" insistence on the mandatory veiling of Moslem women.

An Odyssey of Words: Evolution of the Arabic Language in the 20th Century

By 
Georgine Ayoub

Spoken by more than 250 million individuals today, the Arabic language is the only language among the Semitic languages that has undergone a constant expansion for nearly three millennia. The last 150 years have been among the most decisive years in its evolution.

 

Spoken by more than 250 million individuals today, the Arabic language is the only language among the Semitic languages that has undergone a constant expansion for nearly three millennia. The last 150 years have been among the most decisive years in its evolution.

Chronicles of Dark Humor: Palestinian Filmmaker Snubbed by Oscar

By 
Judith Gabriel

Writer-director Elia Suleiman is now referred to as Palestine's first movie celebrity. His low-budget, darkly comic film "Divine Intervention" is winning critical acclaim and bringing audiences to their feet - and taking away many film festival trophies. But, like its creator, the film is "stateless," and as such, has been denied eligibility for an Academy Award nomination.

Suleiman's characters, on the street and on celluloid, silently rage against the very absurdity of their dispossessed status in a world that turns away from Palestinian reality, humanity-and film.

Science in the Arab World: Between Ideals and Reality

By 
Samir Mattar

Ahmed Zewail's idealism and success is evident on every page of his autobiography, "Voyage Through Time: Walks of Life to the Nobel Prize." He reminds us of the altruism, the enthusiasm, and the stimulating atmosphere experienced by many a foreign student beginning graduate school in the U.S.: "I was working almost day and night and doing several projects at the same time…. Now thinking about it, I cannot imagine doing all of this again, but of course, then I was young and innocent."

The Hyphenated Author: Emerging Genre of 'Arab-American Literature' Poses Questions of Definition, Ethnicity and Art by Lisa Suhair Majaj

By 
Lisa Suhair Majaj

Is there an Arab-American literature?   On the face of it, the question seems a simple one. Of course there is Arab-American literature, if what is meant by this is poetry and prose by American authors of Arab descent.   It is true that we have not produced as much literature as other ethnic groups, even accounting for the small size of our population.

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