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Deadly Identities

By 
Amin Maalouf

Since I left Lebanon in 1976 to establish myself in France, I have been asked many times, with the best intentions in the world, if I felt more French or more Lebanese. I always give the same answer: "Both." Not in an attempt to be fair or balanced but because if I gave another answer I would be lying. This is why I am myself and not another, at the edge of two countries, two or three languages and several cultural traditions. This is precisely what determines my identity. Would I be more authentic if I cut off a part of myself?

Since I left Lebanon in 1976 to establish myself in France, I have been asked many times, with the best intentions in the world, if I felt more French or more Lebanese. I always give the same answer: "Both." Not in an attempt to be fair or balanced but because if I gave another answer I would be lying. This is why I am myself and not another, at the edge of two countries, two or three languages and several cultural traditions. This is precisely what determines my identity. Would I be more authentic if I cut off a part of myself?

Edward Said is Our Conscience and Ambassador to the Human Consciousness

By 
Mahmoud Darwish

I cannot bid farewell to Edward Said because of his overwhelming presence in us and in the world. He is still very much alive in us. Our conscience and ambassador to the human consciousness succumbed yesterday in his long, futile struggle with death. But he never succumbed to, nor stopped resisting the new world order, in his defense of justice and of the humanist tradition, that is common among cultures and civilizations. He was a hero in cheating death during the past 12 years by renewing his fertile creative life through writing, playing music and documenting the human will.

Beirut Hosts a Conference on Edward Said

By 
Nezar Andary

Along with inflation, a growing gap between the rich and poor, and never-ending bickering between self-serving politicians, Beirut, this summer, hosted a conference entitled: “A Salute to Edward Said.”   With the growing censorship found in Beirut, this auspicious event was held during the first week of July and sponsored by the well-known publishing house, Dar al-Adab, which provided a positive impetus for diverse Arab intellectuals to communicate.   The conference created much debate in Beirut, as well as in the Arab press.

Said Speaks Out Before and After 9-11: Muffling the Arab Voice

By 
Judith Gabriel

With the one-year anniversary of September 11 approaching, and as recurring “terrorism alerts” continue to fuel waves of panic and paranoia, the American public remains overwhelmingly mute about violations of civil rights perpetrated against Arabs and Muslims in the U.S. It is an old silence, one which has allowed the demonizing of Arabs to become woven into all aspects of the political and cultural fabric.

Novelist Abd al-Rahman Munif Mourned

By 
Al Jadid Staff

Arab intellectuals are mourning the loss of Abd al-Rahman Munif, one of the greatest and most controversial Arab novelists, who died of a heart attack on January 24 in Syria. He was 71.

Born in Amman, Jordan, to a Saudi father and an Iraqi mother, Munif completed his secondary school education in Jordan. After studying law in Baghdad, he continued his studies in Cairo, ultimately earning a Ph.D. in petroleum economics at the University of Belgrade. During his oil industry career he served as an oil economist in Baghdad, and for OPEC.

Detroit - Arab Capital of North America

By 
Habeeb Salloum

“Imagine! When I first came to Detroit, I thought that I was still in the Arab world.” Muhammad, once a Lebanese, but now an American, remarked when I asked him if he felt a longing for his homeland. He went on, “In fact, this city is much better than southern Lebanon where we were continually dodging bombs and waiting for the next Israeli incursion. Here, I live in an almost Arab city. There are more Arab things to do in this town than in my country.”

Remembering Latifa al-Zayyat

By 
Amal Amireh

Arab cultural circles have recently mourned the loss of the prominent Egyptian intellectual Latifa al-Zayyat, who died of cancer in Cairo on September 10, 1996. She was 73 years old. Her death came soon after she had received Egypt ’s highest State Prize for literature. While the state’s acknowledgment of her achievements was long overdue, al-Zayyat had much popular and collegial support throughout her often difficult life-journey.

Arab cultural circles have recently mourned the loss of the prominent Egyptian intellectual Latifa al-Zayyat, who died of cancer in Cairo on September 10, 1996. She was 73 years old. Her death came soon after she had received Egypt ’s highest State Prize for literature. While the state’s acknowledgment of her achievements was long overdue, al-Zayyat had much popular and collegial support throughout her often difficult life-journey.

Salute to Shirin Ebadi

By 
Adonis

Awarding Shirin Ebadi the Nobel Peace Prize this year is perhaps the greatest event, symbolically, in the history of this prize in all its fields, literary and scientific. It is the first time that an individual did not earn it merely as an acknowledgment for his/her work or creativity, however unique. Granting the award to a Muslim woman lifts this honor to something beyond--and more significant. It mandates a type of deep questioning of a culture in its entirety—of its values, relationships, human dimensions, horizons, and its roots.

Adonis' Warning to Intellectuals: Western & Arab

By 
Elie Chalala

In past wars and crises, Arab culture has become an issue, if not by inviting stereotypical characterizations, then in the debates and controversies among its most celebrated thinkers. During the war on Iraq, this was nowhere more apparent than in the Arab world, though still visible to a lesser extent in the United States, namely among Arab-American intellectuals and academics.

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