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A Letter from Beirut: Disoriented Lebanon

By 
Carole Corm.

Almost 100 days after the assassination of former Lebanese Prime Minister Rafik Hariri, Lebanon has gone through a time warp back into the future, if you will. "If you don't look at a newspaper's date, you might think you are reading the news from 20 years ago,'' exclaimed a friend of mine not long ago. With the death of Hariri, a political void is felt in Lebanon, and with no new generation able to reach the acme of power, the country is left with the same people who were busy fighting each other during the war.

The Knight who Came Home to be Slain

By 
Pierre Abisaab.

Almost 100 days after the assassination of former Lebanese Prime Minister Rafik Hariri, Lebanon has gone through a time warp back into the future, if you will. "If you don't look at a newspaper's date, you might think you are reading the news from 20 years ago,'' exclaimed a friend of mine not long ago. With the death of Hariri, a political void is felt in Lebanon, and with no new generation able to reach the acme of power, the country is left with the same people who were busy fighting each other during the war.

Poets Charge Fadwa Tuqan Slighted in Arab-French Poetry Festival

By 
Sara Hahn

That wealthy and powerful individuals are treated differently than ordinary people, never mind their literary talents, is a longstanding practice and policy. Yet, many of the 15 Arab women poets invited last March by the Arab World Institute to attend the Fifth Festival of Arab-French Poetry in Paris were surprised when they were not treated equally or given the same attention bestowed upon the wealthy Kuwaiti poet and publisher, Souad al-Sabah.

Camera Obscura:Documentary Brings Forbidden Images to American Viewers

By 
Judith Gabriel

Egyptian-American documentary producer Jehane Noujaim, whose documentary “Control Room” broke box office records in its first week of screenings at the prestigious New York Film Forum in June, was fascinated by the contradiction between the popularity of Al Jazeera with the Arab public and how it was denounced by many governments, both Arab and the U.S. She was also curious about the people at Al Jazeera, the journalists who were “taking basically hell from the entire world.”

Andrée Chedid's "WOUNDED BEIRUT "

By 
Mona Takieddine Amyuni

 Black Winds In many languagesmen devastate the land tear it up with gun-fireSmash it with terrorbury it under the dead In the spiral of agesIn the black winds of hatredlove is too light.This poem by Andrée Chedid appeared in the poetry collection “Ceremonial of Violence” in 1976, one year after war broke out in Lebanon. Those few, stark, tragic lines could apply to several tragedies in the last quarter of the century: Beirut.… Sarajevo.... Kosovo.

A Century After Qasim Amin: Fictive Kinship and Historical Uses of " Tahrir al-Mara '"

By 
Malek Abisaab and Rula Jurdi Abisaab

At a time of Islamist scripturalism, political defeatism, and haunting economic divisions, the Egyptian government's Supreme Council of Culture organized a conference to claim Qasim Amin's ideology as its own and to invoke its kinship ties with the “liberation of women.” The six-day conference, which convened in Cairo on October 23, 1999, hosted 40 sessions, 14 round tables, and 10 workshops attended by more than 150 scholars and writers from Arab countries and around the world.*

Vision: Arab-American Literary Criticism

By 
Steven Salaita

In only one or two generations, Arab Americans will achieve a literary renaissance of huge significance. More opportunities for cultural and ethnic validation exist than did in the past, and Arab Americans are now articulating their voices with originality and confidence. As the body of Arab-American literature flourishes and grows, critics and scholars need a specific critical matrix that uses Arab artistic traditions as well as American, and is articulated from within the Arab-American community.

Fadwa Tuqan: An Arab Electra

By 
Abbas Beydoun

Fadwa Tuqan has passed away in her late 80s, but even so we cannot imagine her very old or retired. For many years, Fadwa Tuqan withdrew herself from the literary scene, her absence accentuated by Palestine 's remoteness after 1967. She clung to her home by becoming more Palestinian, as if she returned to Palestine and disappeared beyond the bridge which separates the West Bank from Jordan.

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