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Entering its 11th Year: Al Jadid Magazine Begins Second Decade Quality – Coverage, and Dynamic Change

By 
Elie Chalala

With this double issue (nos. 50/51) Al Jadid magazine enters its 11th year. During the past decade, we have rarely talked about ourselves, our pleasures or pains, neither self-congratulatory nor inviting pity. This has included not talking about our financial difficulties as well as the acclaim Al Jadid has received, including letters of support, articles and reviews written about Al Jadid in national and international magazines and newspapers, as well as professional, academic and mainstream books from major publishers.

Assia Djebar Elected to French Academy: Immortal Sycophant or Courageous Humanist?

By 
Lynne Rogers

Assia Djebar has broken new ground as she is the first Muslim North African woman to become an "immortal" or life-long member of the prestigious French Academy, founded in 1635 by Cardinal Richelieu during the reign of King Louis XIII "to protect and monitor the French Language."

Assia Djebar has broken new ground as she is the first Muslim North African woman to become an "immortal" or life-long member of the prestigious French Academy, founded in 1635 by Cardinal Richelieu during the reign of King Louis XIII "to protect and monitor the French Language."

The Other Prison

By 
Mohammad Ali Atassi.

Can one understand the experience of being a prisoner without ever being in a prison cell? This question might seem strange at first, but those who have met and talked with the family members of political prisoners in Syria will definitely know the answer. In a recent article, my friend and colleague, Yassin al-Hajj Salih (in An Anahar Literary Supplement, June 27, 2004 ), accurately describes life inside prison, calling for bringing the prison experience into the light, in all its different aspects, until nothing remains unknown or overburdened with suppressed memory.

Louis Awad's Secular Tradition; Samir Nakash's Love of Arab Culture; Rethinking Edward Said's ‘Orientalism'; Arab Satellite TV Funding

By 
Beige Luciano-Adams

A new issue of Al Jadid is out (Vol. 10, no. 48). As usual it covers a wide range of topics and subjects in the field of Arab and Mideast culture, arts, and literature. Topics covered in this issue include the civil liberties of Arab-Americans, the Palestine-Israel conflict, Arab media, Jewish-Arab relations, critical intellectual discourse, and much more.

A Year After Sunset: Remembering Amina Rizk

By 
Miranda Bechara

A year ago, the famous Egyptian actress Amina Rizk died at the age of 93 after a rich artistic life. Born in 1910, Rizk started her career at an early age when she moved to Cairo from Tanta with her mother, grandmother, and aunt after the death of her father. Her aunt, Amina Mohamed, was an actress with the Ramsis Theater, which had been established by the late Youssef Wehbi. Because of her aunt's example, young Amina entered the magical world of acting.

War, Peace and Garbage

By 
Hanan Chebib

When traveling, the world is a classroom. At times, the intended lesson does not come at the time of study. My time of study began in 1992, at the age of 19, shortly after Lebanon 's civil war ended. My parents had sent the three of us, my sister, my brother and me, to our grandparents for a month.

A Letter from Beirut: Disoriented Lebanon

By 
Carole Corm.

Almost 100 days after the assassination of former Lebanese Prime Minister Rafik Hariri, Lebanon has gone through a time warp back into the future, if you will. "If you don't look at a newspaper's date, you might think you are reading the news from 20 years ago,'' exclaimed a friend of mine not long ago. With the death of Hariri, a political void is felt in Lebanon, and with no new generation able to reach the acme of power, the country is left with the same people who were busy fighting each other during the war.

The Knight who Came Home to be Slain

By 
Pierre Abisaab.

Almost 100 days after the assassination of former Lebanese Prime Minister Rafik Hariri, Lebanon has gone through a time warp back into the future, if you will. "If you don't look at a newspaper's date, you might think you are reading the news from 20 years ago,'' exclaimed a friend of mine not long ago. With the death of Hariri, a political void is felt in Lebanon, and with no new generation able to reach the acme of power, the country is left with the same people who were busy fighting each other during the war.

Poets Charge Fadwa Tuqan Slighted in Arab-French Poetry Festival

By 
Sara Hahn

That wealthy and powerful individuals are treated differently than ordinary people, never mind their literary talents, is a longstanding practice and policy. Yet, many of the 15 Arab women poets invited last March by the Arab World Institute to attend the Fifth Festival of Arab-French Poetry in Paris were surprised when they were not treated equally or given the same attention bestowed upon the wealthy Kuwaiti poet and publisher, Souad al-Sabah.

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